Activity 3: Telephone Talk

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Children need opportunities to participate in conversations. They learn to take turns as they listen and respond. Communication skills are the foundation for getting along with others.

Words & Language: Activity 3

Benefits for Your Child:

  • Expresses self through language
  • Builds confidence in speaking
  • Develops social skills

Children need opportunities to participate in conversations. They learn to take turns as they listen and respond. Communication skills are the foundation for getting along with others.

telephone

Kindergarten Connection tooltip

During circle time at school and many other times during the day, children will take turns speaking and listening to each other, to the teacher, or to the class.

Activity: Telephones

Make a "telephone" by connecting two paper cups or tin cans with string or yarn. Poke a hole in the bottom of each cup or can. Thread one end of the string through one hole and tie a knot so it won’t slide back out. Do this again with the opposite end of the string and the remaining hole. Hold one cup to your mouth and give the other cup to your child to put to his/her ear to listen while you talk. Pull the string or yarn tight and talk. Take turns with your child being the one to talk and the one to listen. Begin a conversation with your child. Ask questions that require more than a "yes" or "no" answer. "Hi, how are you, what did you do that was fun today?" Comment, share, and help your child expand responses.

Materials:

  • Five feet of string or yarn
  • Two paper cups or cans with a small hole in the bottom of each

More Ideas:

  • Call someone on a real telephone—a relative, or a family friend.
  • Coach your child on how to begin and end a telephone conversation.
  • Practice taking turns in a conversation using a “talking stick” (wooden spoon, ruler, or pencil). The person holding the “talking stick” talks while others listen and then passes the stick to the next person.

Tips:

  • If your child does not have anything to say, be silly! Pretend to be a favorite character he/she knows when you call your child.
  • You may want to think of topics beforehand (favorite foods, books, toys, or friends).
  • Start with short conversations and begin making them longer as your child shows more interest and ability.

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Books: Telephone Talk

The Telephone Book by Dorothy Kunhardt. Open the drawer, mail the letter, and answer the telephone.

I Wonder Why the Telephone Rings and Other Questions About Communication by Richard Mead. Questions and answers explore the world of animal and human communication.

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